What Happens After You Receive a Firearms or Weapons Offense?

What Happens After You Receive a Firearms or Weapons Offense?

Although a rough topic to discuss, mass shootings have become a huge part of our modern society. Because of this, countless states across the nation have begun cracking down on gun owners far and wide. If you were one of these gun owners that received a firearms or weapons offense charge, you might now be asking what is next and how to handle the situation properly.

Because we at Finnell, McGuinness, Nezami & Andux, P.A. never want individuals feeling confused by the law and the charges they’ve been dealt, we’ve compiled a step-by-step guide below to help you prepare for your court case and beyond.

  • Your Firearm Rights Will be Suspended

After you have been charged with the firearm or weapons offense, you will likely be unsure of what happens next or how to go about the next few months before your case. For starters, one good thing to keep in mind is that your firearm rights will be suspended until final discharge.

This means that being found yielding a firearm during this time could result in you returning to jail with double firearm offenses and a probation violation likewise.

  • You Will Need to Consult With a Firearm and Weapons Offenses Attorney

The minute you are out of jail and back on the streets, you must begin searching for a qualified local defense attorney that will help you to create the best case possible for your situation. Think of this time as a race and the quicker you find an attorney, the likelier your chances will be that you will receive the least amount of time and cheapest fine given.

Furthermore, although you could rely on a public defender or self-representation, it is best to have a qualified attorney as they will be able to use the law to their benefit and compile evidence you simply would not be able to on your own or with public defense.

  • Fines Will Need to be Paid

According to the  , the typical firearm or weapons offense fine is anywhere between $500 and $1500. Depending on the state, these fines will vary but, in Florida, you can expect to pay less but be required to do three days detention and 100 hours of community service for a first offense.

If your fines are not paid on time, a warrant will go out for your arrest, and you will return to jail and repeat the process over again with additional fees and possible jail time.

  • Probation Typically Lasts 6 Months to 1 Year

Once your court hearing is complete, you will have to deal with a probation period that limits gun use and other irresponsible habits such as drinking, traveling without consent, and so on. These probation periods typically last anywhere between six months and one year. If you are lucky, your probation will be unsupervised meaning you will have more freedom than a supervised individual would. These are mostly granted to first offenders.

In the end, if you are looking for a firearm and weapons offense attorney in Clay County, contact us today! All of us at Finnell, McGuinness, Nezami & Andux, P.A. will be happy to help you by consulting with you on your case immediately to reduce your stress and streamline the process!